Tips for a Direct Mail Marketing Campaing

Think biggerFlyer-for-Facebook

– Using oversized, versus the traditional 5” x 3” size because the bigger ones break through the clutter of standard #10 envelopes you receive. It’s always a good idea to take a sample to the post office to check the mailing costs before you print them; oversized or square cards usually cost a bit more.


eye.jpg
Make it Colorful

– In the past, it cost more to print in full color than black-and-white. Today, with on demand digital printing, the cost difference is negligible. It’s worth it anyway; bright colors have a lot more impact than black-and- white.

Tease your readers

cyber.jpeg
– You don’t have to write a full story on the front of the postcard. Just a simple, catchy headline of 10 words or less should be enough to entice them to flip it over and read more.

Choose an all-type layout, illustration or photo

– With the availability of thousands of low-cost images at http://www.iStockPhoto.com and other sites, there’s no excuse for having a boring layout.

Keep the body copy simple

– The postcard copy should be a few paragraphs with some bullet copy. The shorter it is, the bigger it can be.

Make the offer prominentScreen Shot 2016-01-06 at 6.48.56 AM.png

– I like to use dotted lines around the offer in the coupons to make them jump off the page like a coupon. Or at least use large, bold type. The easier it is to see the offer, the better it will perform.

Be professional

– Even if you think you can craft or design a strong headline, brief copy and a strong offer by yourself, I suggest you hire or consult with professional direct response copywriters and designers to guide your creativity. They may say your campaign is fine, offer ways to improve it, or candidly tell you to start over.

Mail to your best customers and prospects

– Where email costs virtually nothing to send, you have to pay for postcard printing and postage. You have the option of sending by First Class mail for quick delivery or Bulk Rate, which can take up to a week but costs less. Per a Direct Marketing Association 2009 survey, expect a direct response rate of 3.65% for your own list and 1.65% for a prospect list. Your direct response rates may vary, but try to have the mail arrive on Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday, which are usually the best days for getting a response.

Track results

– Set up a spreadsheet to track how well your campaign is doing with each mailing, noting the date mailed, the number of postcards mailed, and the responses you get. Screen Shot 2016-01-06 at 6.50.25 AM.png

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: